Early american settlements outline

The environment during the latest Pleistocene[ edit ] For an introduction to the radiocarbon dating techniques used by archaeologists and geologists, see radiocarbon dating. Emergence and submergence of Beringia[ edit ] Figure1. As water accumulated in glaciers, the volume of water in the oceans correspondingly decreased, resulting in lowering of global sea level.

Early american settlements outline

Early Settlements The early s saw the beginning of a great tide of emigration from Europe to North America. Spanning more than three centuries, this movement grew from a trickle of a few hundred English colonists to a flood of millions of newcomers.

Impelled by powerful and diverse motivations, they built a new civilization on the northern part of the continent.

Settlement of the Americas - Wikipedia

The first English immigrants to what is now the United States crossed the Atlantic long after thriving Spanish colonies had been established in Mexico, the West Indies and South America.

Like all early travelers to the New World, they came in small, overcrowded ships. During their six- to week voyages, they lived on meager rations. Many died of disease; ships were often battered by storms and some were lost at sea.

Most European emigrants left their homelands to escape political oppression, to seek the freedom to practice their religion, or for adventure and opportunities denied them at home.

Between andeconomic difficulties swept England.

Many people could not find work. Even skilled artisans could earn little more than a bare living. Poor crop yields added to the distress.

Early american settlements outline

In addition, the Industrial Revolution had created a burgeoning textile industry, which demanded an ever-increasing supply of wool to keep the looms running. Landlords enclosed farmlands and evicted the peasants in favor of sheep cultivation.

Colonial expansion became an outlet for this displaced peasant population. The colonists' first glimpse of the new land was a vista of dense woods.

The settlers might not have survived had it not been for the help of friendly Indians, who taught them how to grow native plants -- pumpkin, squash, beans and corn. In addition, the vast, virgin forests, extending nearly 2, kilometers along the Eastern seaboard, proved a rich source of game and firewood.

They also provided abundant raw materials used to build houses, furniture, ships and profitable cargoes for export. Although the new continent was remarkably endowed by nature, trade with Europe was vital for articles the settlers could not produce. The coast served the immigrants well.

The whole length of shore provided innumerable inlets and harbors.

CHAPTER 1: Early America

Only two areas -- North Carolina and southern New Jersey -- lacked harbors for ocean-going vessels. Majestic rivers -- the Kennebec, Hudson, Delaware, Susquehanna, Potomac and numerous others -- linked lands between the coast and the Appalachian Mountains with the sea.

Only one river, however, the St. Lawrence -- dominated by the French in Canada -- offered a water passage to the Great Lakes and into the heart of the continent. Dense forests, the resistance of some Indian tribes and the formidable barrier of the Appalachian Mountains discouraged settlement beyond the coastal plain.

Only trappers and traders ventured into the wilderness. For the first hundred years the colonists built their settlements compactly along the coast. Political considerations influenced many people to move to America.

The subsequent revolt and triumph of Charles' opponents under Oliver Cromwell in the s led many cavaliers -- "king's men" -- to cast their lot in Virginia.North of Mexico the only settlements were Saint Augustine and the isolated outpost in northern New Mexico. Exploration of the interior was largely abandoned after the s.

Around Newfoundland or more boats annually were fishing for cod and some fishermen were trading for furs, especially at Tadoussac on the Saint Lawrence. IB History 11 17 September America Chapters Challenges to the Spanish empire a. The success of Spain encourages Portugal, France, England, . The charter later became an important document in American history because it guaranteed the settlers the same rights as the people of England.

In , King James I granted a charter to colonize Virginia, the whole area claimed by England in the New World, to a joint-stock company called the Virginia Company of London. IB History 11 17 September America Chapters Challenges to the Spanish empire a. The success of Spain encourages Portugal, France, England, .

Early Settlements The early s saw the beginning of a great tide of emigration from Europe to North America. Spanning more than three centuries, this movement grew from a trickle of a few hundred English colonists to a flood of millions of newcomers.

CHAPTER 1: Early America. An Outline of American History The opulence of their "potlatch" gatherings remains a standard for extravagance and festivity probably unmatched in early American history. NATIVE AMERICAN CULTURES.

The America that greeted the first Europeans was, thus, far from an empty wilderness. EARLY SETTLEMENTS.

Outline of American History - Chapter 1: Early America